Those issues can be part of what's known as the “keto flu,” Warren says. Other side effects of the keto diet, all of which are tied to carb withdrawal, can include lightheadedness, nausea, mental fog, cramps, and headaches, in addition to tiredness. Luckily, the keto flu doesn't usually last more than a week—which is coincidentally about when people start to see the number on the scale go down, says Warren.
Even after irradiation (the industry standard sterilization process that also destroys any antioxidants and health benefits), spices and herbs can spoil in your home, and often harbor aggressive mold toxins. To spice up your dishes the Bulletproof way, use high-quality, fresh or recently opened herbs and spices. Spices with especially high mold toxin risk include black pepper, powdered garlic, nutmeg, and paprika. Apple cider vinegar is the only vinegar permitted in the Bulletproof diet, as other vinegars and yeasts introduce toxins, and promote yeast growth in your gut.
Firstly, research shows that the keto diet is difficult to tolerate as it can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and tiredness. These are common complaints when someone is going through cancer treatment. If you're trying to reduce the incidence of symptoms, the keto diet is more likely to bring on or worsen these symptoms rather than help a person move through them. This would not only be unpleasant for the person undergoing treatment, but it also reduces their ability to tolerate the full dose of therapy.
Another trick: Make healthy choices the norm by training your body over time, rather than depending on willpower. In one study, Wood trained research subjects in her lab to choose carrots as a snack when they were hungry, reinforcing that carrot-picking behavior "hundreds of times." Once those people were accustomed to snacking on carrots, they continued to select them even when presented with M&Ms as an alternative.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Hi Julie, thank you for stopping by. As someone who has been on this diet for over three years, I can tell you that eventually, you will be able to add more fruits into your diet. Remember that once you reach your goal weight you will be in maintenance mode and will have more food options. You may find that bananas cause you to crave sweets and may never eat them again, but I loved adding fruits back in my diet!

In Asia, the normal diet includes rice and noodles as the main energy source, making their elimination difficult. Therefore, the MCT-oil form of the diet, which allows more carbohydrate, has proved useful. In India, religious beliefs commonly affect the diet: some patients are vegetarians, will not eat root vegetables or avoid beef. The Indian ketogenic diet is started without a fast due to cultural opposition towards fasting in children. The low-fat, high-carbohydrate nature of the normal Indian and Asian diet means that their ketogenic diets typically have a lower ketogenic ratio (1:1) than in America and Europe. However, they appear to be just as effective.[54]


At the core of the classic keto diet is severely restricting intake of all or most foods with sugar and starch (carbohydrates). These foods are broken down into sugar (insulin and glucose) in our blood once we eat them, and if these levels become too high, extra calories are much more easily stored as body fat and results in unwanted weight gain. However, when glucose levels are cut off due to low-carb intake, the body starts to burn fat instead and produces ketones that can be measured in the blood (using urine strips, for example).
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